Pilates Students' Manual

Healing Through Pilates with Carla Shifflett

August 27, 2020 Olivia Bioni Season 2 Episode 13
Pilates Students' Manual
Healing Through Pilates with Carla Shifflett
Chapters
0:00
Welcome
1:25
Pilates on the Path to Healing
11:17
Teaching Movement Patterns
16:19
Pilates as Meditation
22:10
Eureka Moments
23:41
Pilates as Preventative Medicine
24:54
Pivoting and Expanding Offerings
27:37
Final Thoughts
Pilates Students' Manual
Healing Through Pilates with Carla Shifflett
Aug 27, 2020 Season 2 Episode 13
Olivia Bioni

Carla is a Pilates student, teacher, and the founder of Posture Studio in Charlottesville, Virginia in the US. She shares the ways that Pilates helped her heal from a serious injury through re-learning movement patterns and breaking free of pain patterns. Her story of Pilates as a form of corrective and rehabilitative exercise is honest, relatable, and inspiring. 

Follow the podcast on Instagram @pilatesstudentsmanual and on the web here: https://bit.ly/PilatesStudentsManual for the latest! 

Email [email protected] with your feedback. 

Show Notes: 

Carla found rehabilitative Pilates in 1998 while recovering from injuries that did not improve after years of traditional physical therapy approaches. She spent the following years in a long, involved training to learn how to teach movement retraining to others.  In 2002, she became a certified Pilates instructor through The Physical Mind Institute and has also studied the STOTT PILATES method extensively.  She studied and worked at The Albemarle Center for Health & Rehabilitation and found that years of working with an injured population taught her the art of seeing structural imbalances clearly. She opened Posture Studio to keep others from developing chronic pain in their own lives.

Visit her Posture Studio's site to learn more about offerings and workshops: *posturestudio.com* and visit their YouTube channel! You can also follow her on Instagram @carlasposture and @posturestudio, and check out the studio hashtags #posturestudio and #loveishowwemove.


Support the podcast:    

Visit *links.oliviabioni.com/affliates* to try out products that I use and love, and take advantage of great discounts when you use my affiliate links!


Episode Music: 

This episode uses NCS music in compliance with https://ncs.io/usage-policy

Track: Syn Cole - Gizmo [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/pZzSq8WfsKo
Free Download / Stream: http://ncs.io/Gizmo

Track: Syn Cole - Feel Good [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/q1ULJ92aldE
Free Download / Stream: http://ncs.io/feelgood

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/oliviapodcasts)

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Carla is a Pilates student, teacher, and the founder of Posture Studio in Charlottesville, Virginia in the US. She shares the ways that Pilates helped her heal from a serious injury through re-learning movement patterns and breaking free of pain patterns. Her story of Pilates as a form of corrective and rehabilitative exercise is honest, relatable, and inspiring. 

Follow the podcast on Instagram @pilatesstudentsmanual and on the web here: https://bit.ly/PilatesStudentsManual for the latest! 

Email [email protected] with your feedback. 

Show Notes: 

Carla found rehabilitative Pilates in 1998 while recovering from injuries that did not improve after years of traditional physical therapy approaches. She spent the following years in a long, involved training to learn how to teach movement retraining to others.  In 2002, she became a certified Pilates instructor through The Physical Mind Institute and has also studied the STOTT PILATES method extensively.  She studied and worked at The Albemarle Center for Health & Rehabilitation and found that years of working with an injured population taught her the art of seeing structural imbalances clearly. She opened Posture Studio to keep others from developing chronic pain in their own lives.

Visit her Posture Studio's site to learn more about offerings and workshops: *posturestudio.com* and visit their YouTube channel! You can also follow her on Instagram @carlasposture and @posturestudio, and check out the studio hashtags #posturestudio and #loveishowwemove.


Support the podcast:    

Visit *links.oliviabioni.com/affliates* to try out products that I use and love, and take advantage of great discounts when you use my affiliate links!


Episode Music: 

This episode uses NCS music in compliance with https://ncs.io/usage-policy

Track: Syn Cole - Gizmo [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/pZzSq8WfsKo
Free Download / Stream: http://ncs.io/Gizmo

Track: Syn Cole - Feel Good [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/q1ULJ92aldE
Free Download / Stream: http://ncs.io/feelgood

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/oliviapodcasts)

Olivia: [00:00:00] Welcome to Pilates Students' Manual, everything you want to know about Pilates in one place. I'm Olivia, and I'll be your host. Jump in the conversation on Instagram @pilatesstudentsmanual. And be sure to subscribe for updates on new episodes. Let's learn something new together.

Hello, hello everybody. Welcome back to the podcast. I am so excited to share with you today that I'm going to be having a conversation with Carla Shifflett, who is incredible. She is a Pilates teacher and the founder of Posture Studio in Charlottesville, Virginia. We're going to be talking about the benefits of [00:01:00] Pilates and also the importance of Pilates as it fits into a healing journey, as well as hearing a bit more about her studio, Posture Studio in Charlottesville.

Thank you so much for being on the show, Carla. 

Carla: [00:01:13] Thank you for having me. 

Olivia: [00:01:14] So the first thing I always like to jump into whenever I'm talking to a teacher or a student is just, how did you find Pilates? And what did you think about it when you first? 

Carla: [00:01:25] Well, I found Pilates as a form of rehabilitation. I did not come to it through dance or through being into yoga or an athlete or anything like that.

I remember the first time I saw a Pilates machine. It's probably been over 20 years ago. And I had a friend whose mother had a place machine in her house and they had lived out in California for some time and they had moved to Charlottesville, Virginia, and she brought it to her house. 

I had been struggling with pain in my body for years. I had an injury that left [00:02:00] me limping and horrible pain on the left side of my body. And I was seeking out help in every direction. I went to chiropractors, to physical therapists, to doctors, to massage. I had Reiki and acupuncture doing everything that I could and spending a ton of money, trying to figure out how to get better.

And I remember my friend's mother, she knew that I was on this journey and was having a lot of pain. And she said, have you ever tried Pilates? And she showed me this machine. And I remember just thinking, she's gotta be kidding me. Right? Like, that's not going to help me. All these other things aren't helping me. But she was insistent that it helped her with some injuries that she had. And she recommended someone in Charlottesville. 

Around the same time, I was fortunate enough to have a doctor refer me to someone in Charlottesville who's a doctor and an osteopath. And just so happens that this doctor's wife was the person who was teaching Pilates in Charlottesville. She still does, using it as a rehab approach. [00:03:00] And so I ended up in this doctor's office who then said, you know, I think that Pilates would be helpful. So it was kind of those two worlds kind of collided, where I had a friend mentioned this woman. And then I happened to end up in the doctor's office where she was working out of.

I listened and I went, and I remember the first time I saw her. Her name is Diana Bauer and she's an amazing healer and practitioner. And she changed my life. She is a family nurse practitioner who got into teaching Pilates for her own rehab issues. 

I remember the first day I went in, she did this postural analysis. It kind of blew me away just because all of the people that I had seen, no one had ever taken the time to talk to me about what they saw going on in my body. And so she was able to quickly show me that I had a rotation in my pelvis. And then because of the rotation of my pelvis, I was bearing weight through my legs evenly and it was rotating my upper body. So my shoulders were uneven. And so [00:04:00] exercise that I was doing for rehab, it was actually strengthening a weakness. I wasn't fixing anything. And so she was able to show this to me by looking in mirrors. 

And at the time I was 28 years old, and I'm fine with mirrors the older I've gotten, but when I was young, I was, you know, judgmental of myself in front of a mirror. So I remember just being kind of freaked out at first, standing in front of a mirror, looking at myself and trying to turn on my analytical brain instead of my critical thinking brain about my body or how I looked. And I just remember being blown away at what I saw, things that I had never seen, you know, looked at myself all the time and noticing saying that I was kind of like my lower body was walking in one direction and my upper body was facing the other direction.

So she was showing me how to align things back up, how to consider moving and neutral alignment of my torso. And then started talking to me about other concepts, like: how you would flex your body or extend and the whens and the whys and the hows. It blew my mind. 

At the time, I was [00:05:00] actually, I majored in philosophy and religion. I wanted to go back to graduate school, to get my master's in philosophy. And so it really intrigued me intellectually. It kind of kicked into that part of my brain. I was hooked. I was like, okay, everything she said made sense. And she didn't just look at me and just send me home with a bunch of exercises to do and a bunch of ideas, like, you know, maybe sit in a bath or take this medicine, or even had one doctor say, let's do exploratory surgery on your knee cause we're not quite sure. Or, you know, all of these things let's wrap your knee. 

She gave me things to consider that I could look at. And to me that was educating me as a person. And that's what really intrigued me about Pilates was that it handed me information. It empowered me as a client or as a patient. 

Olivia: [00:05:47] I felt similarly that idea of empowerment that I came to Pilates from yoga. One of the things that I loved about Pilates and drew me to it at first was that it [00:06:00] gave me a language that I could intellectually like engage with.

And I could really, like you said, I can see the difference. I can look in the mirror. And that's something that's so powerful about doing Pilates is that you become more, more aware of yourself in like a very specific way and you can begin to change it. First you have that awareness and then you can begin to change it.

It's really powerful, I think for students and just like in your own Pilates journey, as you're doing Pilates. 

Carla: [00:06:27] That's right. That's exactly how I felt. And that was really the first session, you know, and also talking about breathing and educating me about breath movement. You know, my breathing pattern had actually gotten off because of my pain.

Just like what you just said, I did a lot of yoga. I did a lot of other stuff just to try to calm my mind down because when you're in pain all the time, it gets to the point that you can't even concentrate at times on conversations. You can't even hear other stuff, the pain is so loud. The noise of the pain is so loud. And that's how I lived for years with this [00:07:00] loud noise in my head. 

And so I do other forms of movement just to try to make myself better or whether it was go on long walks or try yoga classes, but nothing ever really made a difference. You know, I might calm down my nervous system a little bit, but I was never really able to change the pain pattern in my body.

And so this was the first I felt like I actually had tools to see, wait a minute there's patterns of movement and there's ways that I could move that could assist me in ways that I can move that are gonna hurt me. And again, having someone show me that if I'm moving in this dysfunctional pattern and I'm exercising in this dysfunctional pattern, I'm strengthening that dysfunctional pattern.

And so having to break it down and look at patterns of movement again, and figure out, okay, can I lie on my back and just find neutral pelvis or neutral ribcage and a neutral shoulder girdle? How do those relate to my neck? How do they relate to my sacrum? And just lying on the floor, seeing if I could even be in that position and then [00:08:00] considering, okay, now can you move a limb? Can you move a leg or an arm and sustain this, or does the whole system start falling apart? As soon as you go into moving one of your weighted levers, which is your arms and legs, and mine would just immediately fall apart. Even when I was supported by the floor. And so of course, if I'm supported by the floor and I can't lift my leg without everything falling apart, then I definitely can't walk and lift my leg when I have the force of gravity and the pressure off of the floor against me. I can't walk without letting that happen as well. And so it was incredible and eye-opening and the education that ensued was life changing. 

It completely changed my life and changed my career. I mean, 20 years later, I'm passionate about this, even when I'm not working, you know, I'm always talking to people about this. It's just something I truly believe in. 

Olivia: [00:08:48] How has this changed the way you teach or maybe even the way that you formed your studio, this experience that you had with pain and with the healing power of Pilates? 

[00:09:00] Carla: [00:08:59] Well, so I ended up being a client at this practice for some time. And then after a while, you know, it was better. I got better. My mentor said to me, you should really go and study this and maybe work for us because you're really good at this. And I remember laughing out loud because I never considered myself a mover. You know, I always liked to exercise when I was young, I played a little bit of sports, so it was never that great at it, but I still played and I liked it. I was average, I would say. 

And then all through high school and college, I always went to, you know, back in the nineties, our version of HIIT classes back then, you know, I did those all the time. These were before my injuries happened. I was a swimmer and I swam a lot, but I never thought about movement ever when I was doing all those things. It was just something I did. I didn't analyze it. I was thinking about other things when I was moving. 

So when she said that this to me, I literally laughed out loud because I thought, yeah, it's not going to happen. But then I ended up going out, you know, on my own, just thinking I'm going to go back to school and do all these other things.

And I kept [00:10:00] wanting access to those Pilates machines because they had changed me so much. And I was still doing the mat work, but the machines were really helpful for me because of the strengthening aspect of what you can do on the machines when you push and pull weight. And so then I thought, well, okay, I'll just go ahead and get a certification and try to work at a studio.

And I remember when I first started teaching at a studio or just being terrified because, you know, I had people come up to me and say things like, well, my back is hurting or this is hurting. And I didn't know how to answer those questions, really. I had some idea, but I didn't really know. I went back to this mentor, this person who had healed me and she said, you know, if you want me to mentor you, I will. And then you can work with me. 

And so that's what I did. And I also went back to school and I took a bunch of, a whole ton of Pilates classes from a few different schools and started studying biomechanics of movement more, actually went back to school for a little while to study as well. So anyway, I ended up working at her clinic for a while, but then at some point I realized that [00:11:00] everyone that we saw at that clinic, they were pretty hurt. I want it to catch people before they got hurt or people who were like me, who had finished their rehab, but wanted to continue to change their movement patterns so that they could last forever, so that their body would not break down as quickly. 

And so to me, when I first opened my studio, I was really interested in catching people, pre-rehab and post-rehab so that I could educate them. You know, if they weren't injured yet. You know, you see all the time that say, Oh, I just have this glitch, you know, when I'm running or when I'm doing this thing, you just have this catch or this thing. Learning and knowing how to explain to them how to get out of that so that it doesn't become a chronic issue.

And, you know, as you know, once part of the fabric of your body starts kind of falling apart, the rest of it's gonna fall out. You know, I think as a body, like just a big piece of fabric, you know, and if I take my shirt and crunch it up at my shoulder, it's going to have an effect on the rest of my shirt or of my dress. And so the body is the same. And so being [00:12:00] able to catch people before they have that systemic issue that's going to happen because they have a gait issue or a shoulder issue or whatever. 

So when I first opened, I just started doing privates and sometimes duets and educating people on the analysis of movement patterns and using Pilates as a way to get them to understand these concepts and also exercises that they could do on their own or in the studio, and then applications of those exercises to life. And so, you know, when you're lying down on your back and trying to lift one knee toward you, neutral pelvis, how is that applicable? And why are we doing this? 

To me, the one hour that they had with me a week, that was the education. The real practice came when they left a studio and they can start applying what they were learning from me to their life. 

And again, that's what changed my life. It wasn't going to a class or getting PT advice for an hour those couple of exercises that I had. It was literally when I learned how to [00:13:00] change movement patterns in my life. So I started thinking differently about how I'm standing, how I'm walking, how I'm sitting, how I pick up something, how I get in and out of the car. All of that is the true exercise. 

When I opened my studio and what I continue to do with my studio, is I'll teach people applications of movement patterns using Pilates to do that. But then every class I'm talking about, okay, so right now you're pretty much doing the squat. When you go home and pick up something. Or when you're moving your shoulder in this way, this is a functional movement. And this is when the shoulder does that in real life. And so to me, it's all about making Pilates and, as a movement teacher, anything that I teach applicable. 

Olivia: [00:13:40] I really love that you focus on the functionality of Pilates because I think that Pilates is unique in that when you do it in the studio, it's almost a movement laboratory that we're learning building blocks of extension and flexion and breathing. But like anything, if you [00:14:00] only do it while you're in the studio, it doesn't have the huge impact. You know, you really need to incorporate that, like you said, into your life, into the way you pick things up the way you get into the car. 

We get into the car more than we do Pilates, you know, we pick things up more than we go to the studio and we always will. And that's fine, but I love that real life application that you have. 

Carla: [00:14:23] And that made sense to me when I started realizing, wait a minute, this is my practice. I'm learning kind of the ABC's of movement right now. And I'm going to then take that and apply it.

When I was growing up, I played piano. I started thinking about it in those terms, you know, I would go to my teacher. I would take my one hour lesson a week, but then I would apply what I was learning to the practice of playing the piano throughout the week. And that's how you get better. You don't get better by just going to your piano teacher once a week.

You know, you're going to learn something. Things are going to change over time, over a long, long, long period of time. And you might [00:15:00] just be like, you know what, this isn't working and that quit. But if you take that information and you start applying it. Even the best musicians, they always practice their scales forever. They're always gonna play the scales. 

And that's how I see the ABCs of movement with these movement patterns. And what Pilates does. Always practice these basic movements, and then you can make them beautiful and get fancy and do all kinds of cool things and you go faster. But at the end of the day, if you don't get that foundation, you're going to get sloppy.

Your music's going to get sloppy if you're a musician. If you're a mover, it's going to get sloppy. So always going back to that. And if you don't understand what those ABCs are, you don't have a foundation and that's the beauty of Pilates. That's really the beauty of it. There's so much emphasis on form and why that's important, and it is truly life changing.

Olivia: [00:15:54] Hey there. Enjoying the episode? Me too, you should definitely subscribe. So you get [00:16:00] notifications about new episodes. If you love it, maybe leave me a review. That would be awesome. Thanks for sharing the Pilates love. Now back to the show.

Carla: [00:16:19] And actually for me, it also is very meditative. And for me, with my injuries, you know, when you have an injury and you're stuck in a pain pattern for a long period of time and your mind foggy with pain, it's really hard to shift that pain pattern. 

And, you know, and that's what they know about pain management now. Sometimes people who have pain shouldn't even really have pain technically anymore because the injury is healed, but their mind has kinda gotten stuck on this track. Like it keeps going through that pain track. It's like a record that keeps repeating. 

And for me also just studying slow analysis of movement started shifting that track in my head as well. I'm convinced of it. You know, I don't have any proof [00:17:00] of that, but I did feel that when I started lifting my leg, instead of fear, or instead of pain being the first thing, I felt slowly things started shifting into analysis of this movement and creating a new pathway of how I could go through that. It became incredibly meditative.

And to me, that was also absolutely fascinating because like I said, you know, I majored in philosophy of religion in undergrad. I did tons of, you know, meditation, and tons of other types of practice, you know, looking at different religions and the different ways to tap into mind, body, spirit practices. And Pilates was really fascinating to me on that level too, because no one talks about the mind-spirit aspect.

They'll talk about the mind, but not the spirit aspect of Pilates too much. But for me, it was almost like meditation through the back door. After months and months of practicing this work, I would suddenly find that my nervous system had calmed down. I was in a different state, my mind, almost like meditation.

I was truly using movement to change [00:18:00] my mind. And then my mind was changing how my spirit felt. And then it was going back to my body. I was just hooked. That was amazing to me. 

Olivia: [00:18:08] That's so interesting because I've talked with other teachers or some of my students of color, and there can be this idea that you either like yoga or you like Pilates, that you couldn't do both of them. 

But just hearing what you're saying. And also what I felt when I practice either, it's like different doors. I love that. You're like doing meditation through the back door. That there's just another way to get to that sense of calm, that sense of safety. 

I see a lot with my students or I feel for myself as well, the confidence, the self esteem boost that you get, when you feel that you are in control of your body, that you know yourself well enough to move safely.

Those are all really powerful things that can create that sense of peace in your mind, in your body. And I mean, emotionally and all the ways that you can feel calm. 

Carla: [00:18:57] And also the repetition of patterns for right left [00:19:00] brain integration, both sides of your body doing this same thing at the same time. And then sometimes not maybe over your body, your right side goes to your left side and all of that, just so great for the nervous system and for calming the mind.

When I used to do a lot of yoga and one of my original mentors for that, she later became a client of mine, you know, 15 years later dealing with a couple of injuries. And she was practicing with me, learning this methodology for probably about six months before one day she came in and she said, you guys are completely doing the whole meditative thing. You just don't talk about it. She said, you're doing exactly what we're talking about as yoga practitioners. And you're not speaking of it though. And I said, that's right. That's exactly one of the things I love about Pilates is we don't talk about that. But anyone who practices Pilates a lot knows it.

And it's almost like when you go into some of these more spiritually based movement practices, which are wonderful. But initially I had gotten to the point when I would go in and they would talk about how the mind was going to affect the spirit. [00:20:00] I would almost just, I don't know, some part of myself wouldn't let that happen, right? It would just be like, okay, we're going to do this. And it was almost like working towards something that just was never achievable. And to me, just to focus on the movement pattern itself and the repetition of the movement pattern and the breath work that goes along with it just suddenly all of that starts happening. And you don't even realize that that shift is occurring. 

For me, I had a lot of anxiety, I had a lot of pain, you know, I had trauma, and I swear that the work that I did in Pilates, the slow movement, the patterns, all of the things that I'm talking about here helped me as much as any talk therapy did. Again, it's not something I'll talk to my clients about, but I see it in them all the time or they'll come in and they'll just have these like, you know, declarations like, Oh my goodness. I had this huge shift and it has nothing to do with really their body, but it does. They'll start realizing, wait, there's more. There's more here.

For me, Pilates, it's the analysis of [00:21:00] movement. It's empowering the client, through education, which to me is a key. Key, key, key. And it's something that I think the medical world could use more of. And they're starting to, you know, with preventative medicines, you know, really empowering the client with information so that the client can walk away with that information to continue practicing.

And then it's also the mind body work that we're doing that we, like I said, don't talk about. 

Olivia: [00:21:23] Well, I can see how passionate you are about educating your students and that it's not just something that you do mindlessly. It's something that you have to do very mindfully so that they can make those shifts and make those changes and notice those things for themselves.

I think something that's kept me so interested in Pilates and why I love teaching and why I love doing, it is that there's really an agency to it. It's amazing to have a teacher who has eyes on you, who can give you a new way of seeing yourself. But when you start to see yourself for yourself and you start to notice the things. Like before your teacher can say [00:22:00] to lengthen a little bit more or scoop a little bit deeper, that you can feel that and find that for yourself.

It's what makes it so fun. And it's what makes it so different all the time. 

Carla: [00:22:10] Absolutely. I remember the first time that happened to me, actually, the first kind of big a-ha moment I had was like grosser movement. My teacher had been working with me on my scapular bone. My shoulder girdle was so unstable after all the things that I'd gone through. You know, I had these huge wings off of my back and my neck muscles were holding up my arm and just had a lot of pain. 

I remember I moved into a house where I had two mirrors in the bathroom. And so if I was facing the mirror to brush my teeth, there was a mirror behind me where I could see my back. And I didn't put the mirrors there to make it that way, but it just so happened that they were like that.

And I remember one day brushing my teeth and seeing my shoulder winging all over the place just while I was trying to brush my teeth. And just having that moment of knowing what she had been saying to me, what she was asking me to [00:23:00] do and just having that time, where I thought, okay. I can actually look at my back. I can play around with this and I can see how the scapular bone can now attach to my ribcage and become part of my back and not be off of my back anymore.

And just literally that became a little practice for me. Just can I brush my teeth while maintaining shoulder girdle stability? I know it sounds so dorky, but when you're in pain, pain is a huge motivator. That was one of my big like a-ha moments and sort of shifting things on my shoulder greatly. And I would have never gotten that if she hadn't educated me. If she had just given me a series of exercises to do, I would have never gotten that.

Olivia: [00:23:34] So what do you, you want your students to get out of sessions with you or taking classes with you? 

Carla: [00:23:41] I guess to me, I see what we do as preventative medicine. To me, it's preventing injuries, or if you do have an injury that's happened already, keeping your body in a position where you're not going to continue to fall into that injury.

I love exercising. Don't get me wrong. I love doing all kinds of things, the HIIT classes, I love doing online classes, I [00:24:00] love doing the reformer classes, but at the end of the day, for me, If it weren't for the fact that we're actually teaching people and changing their lives through teaching movement, keeping them injury free, or getting them out of pain, I wouldn't be doing this. 

That to me is truly the gift that I was given through my injury. You know, I would never wish on anyone to go through what I went through years of pain, but in this weird way, I'm so thankful that I learned what I learned out of it because I've been able to help so many people with that information. And that's why I do what I do. When I see someone walk in the door and you can see pain on people's faces, you can help them. That is what it's all about for me. 

Olivia: [00:24:42] That's incredible. Charlottesville is very lucky to have you and your studio. I know that your Posture Studio is expanding, or it's expanding its offerings a little bit. Can you tell me about that? 

Carla: [00:24:54] Right now during this pandemic, we had to shift a lot, so we can't have our classes. We're probably about [00:25:00] 50% classes, 50% private based studio. And so that's been a blessing during this pandemic because we still have been able to see people virtually for private, some small group classes. And so we've continued doing that. And now we're able to see people in the studio again, one-on-one or small group. So really that model hasn't changed for us. 

But what has changed for us is, for a long time, I've wanted to do a virtual online-format teaching either clients and teachers, about this methodology. Using Pilates, blending it with a couple of other things, but to teach functional movement patterns and how you can change your movement pattern using these practices. And so we're creating an online format to do that. So it would be an educational platform to teach clients and also teach other teachers who are interested.

So we'll have two different things. And it's going to start off with just a series of workshops for our clients and also for teachers. We've already been doing those in the studio for years, where we teach educational workshops [00:26:00] with physical therapists, or maybe with nurse practitioners, or just with me, but we're going to be taking that online.

Olivia: [00:26:07] That is incredible. For myself, very selfishly, because then I'm able to take classes at your studio. But I think that that's so wonderful. And again, when we're talking about, you know, things that on their surface are awful, but that there's a silver lining to it that this huge shift to having to offer things online has really been able to expand audiences so that you can attend workshops and meet teachers from across the country. 

Carla: [00:26:35] And it's actually given me the time. I mean, I'm a mom, I've got two young kids. I'm a business owner. You know, I've got many people who work for me right now at the studio. Before this happened I just barely had time to even think about anything else, you know. But now this has happened and it's allowed me the space to go ahead and move forward with this project that I've had in my mind for probably about 10 years now. [00:27:00] I've been working on it and I'm really excited. We're going to be launching it in the next few months. 

Olivia: [00:27:05] I'll be including links to Carla's social, to the studio, to her website, so that you'll be able to stay up to date with those workshop offerings. Definitely check her out. She is an incredible teacher and mentor to teachers and students.

And you can just tell just the positive impact that Pilates has had in her life and in the lives of everyone that she meets and teaches. So thank you so much, Carla, for being on the show, unless there's anything else you want to share or throw in? 

Carla: [00:27:36] No, I think that's it. 

I just think honestly, if you're in pain and I think I put this on an Instagram post, which I think you liked, which is how we've met. And I think it was an Instagram post of a picture of me on a bike doing that Superman move, like where you're laying down on a bike, like flying down a Hill. And I just did that for the first time recently, because I have a girlfriend who's a cyclist and she's like, look at my core strength. And she did that and I'm looking [00:28:00] at her, I'm thinking, okay, that's Swan on the reformer is pretty much what she's doing. She's on a bike doing swan. I think I can do that. 

But I had all this fear still trapped in my body based on my injuries. And I was terrified to attempt it. But she's a nurse practitioner. And I thought, well, if I wreck, she's got me. I went up to the top of this Hill and I tried it and I did it on the first try because it's swan on a bike going downhill. And she was floored, just like it takes people years to do that. And I'm not a big bike rider or anything. 

But in that moment, I realized that, you know, I was blessed enough to find a mentor. I was in pain for years and I didn't want to take the pills, pain meds, and I didn't want to, you know, get surgery if they didn't know exactly what was going on. And I didn't want to do certain things. I wanted to find answers. And I'm so thankful that I held out and I found a mentor and that the right mentor was put before me. And I guess the only thing I would really want to say to him, just look for your [00:29:00] mentor. And it takes time. It's not a quick fix. If you're in pain, it takes time. Hopefully someone else can have this type of journey that I had where they can get better. Obviously it doesn't always work that way, but I hold out hope for people that it can. 

Olivia: [00:29:15] That's fantastic. Thank you so so much. 

Carla: [00:29:19] Thank you.

Olivia: [00:29:29] Thanks for stopping by for today's episode of Pilates Students' Manual. Subscribe to follow the podcast and join the community of Pilates lovers on Instagram @pilatesstudentsmanual. You can reach out to me there with questions, comments, or feedback, or send me an email at [email protected]

If you learned something new today, share this episode and the Pilates love. The adventure continues. Until next time. [00:30:00]



Welcome
Pilates on the Path to Healing
Teaching Movement Patterns
Pilates as Meditation
Eureka Moments
Pilates as Preventative Medicine
Pivoting and Expanding Offerings
Final Thoughts